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According to researchers, HTC's One Max handset saved user fingerprints as an unencrypted file. Courtesy of Simon Cousins

Severe Weaknesses in Android Handsets Could Leak User Fingerprints

August 10, 2015 5:00 pm | by Dan Goodin | Comments

HTC and Samsung have patched serious vulnerabilities in some of their Android phones that made it possible for malicious hackers to steal user fingerprints. The researchers who discovered the flaws said that many more phones from all manufacturers may be susceptible to other types of fingerprint-theft attacks.

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As far as the federal government is concerned, cybersecurity expert Michael J. Daugherty says, an additional worry is that cybersecurity responsibilities are in the wrong hands.

Hackers Find Infiltrating Government Computers is not Mission Impossible

August 10, 2015 4:44 pm | by News and Experts | Comments

Retail giants aren’t the only target of hackers who infiltrate computer systems to gain access to sensitive information. The federal government also falls victim, such as recently when the Obama administration revealed 21.5 million people were affected by a breach at OPM. Social Security numbers and other records were stolen; likely anyone given a government background check in the last 15 years was affected.

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Rosenbergs’ Sons Say Their Mother was Innocent of Spying, Ask for Exoneration

August 10, 2015 2:24 pm | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Comments

The prosecution of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg is arguably the trial of the last century in America. The married couple from New York were arrested in 1950, convicted of passing atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, and executed by electric chair on June 19, 1953. Now, their surviving children say the newly released testimony given to a grand jury shows Ethel should never have been executed– and she was guilty only in standing by her man.

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DNA Test Makes Debut in New Jersey Murder Case

August 10, 2015 2:00 pm | by Associated Press, Peter Sampson | Comments

The trial of a Wood-Ridge man accused of beating a woman to death and setting her body on fire will mark the first time that a jury in New Jersey will consider evidence in a murder case based on a "next generation" test that can analyze the DNA from just a few cells of biological material.

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The last few decades have seen numerous exciting technological advances in the forensic sciences. But actually using these new forensic technologies to catch and convict perpetrators and clear the innocent is much more complicated than it looks on TV. Thi

NIJ Social Science Research on Forensic Science

August 7, 2015 3:28 pm | by Katharine Browning, NIJ | Comments

The last few decades have seen numerous exciting technological advances in the forensic sciences. But actually using these new forensic technologies to catch and convict perpetrators and clear the innocent is much more complicated than it looks on TV. This is where social science comes in.

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A state-of-the-art forensic laboratory is being constructed on Washburn University’s campus by the Kansas Bureau of Investigation that will provide a 100,000 square foot facility to students and faculty.

New Campus Forensics Laboratory Nearly Complete

August 7, 2015 1:45 pm | by Lisa Herdman, Washburn Review | Comments

A state-of-the-art forensic laboratory is being constructed on Washburn University’s campus by the Kansas Bureau of Investigation that will provide a 100,000 square foot facility to students and faculty.

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The two men suspected of masquerading as police officers to rob an art museum of $500 million worth of masterpieces in 1990 are dead, the FBI says.

FBI Says Suspects in Huge 1990 Boston Art Heist are Dead

August 7, 2015 1:25 pm | by Rodrique Ngowi and William J. Kole, Associated Press | Comments

The two men suspected of masquerading as police officers to rob an art museum of $500 million worth of masterpieces in 1990 are dead, the FBI says.

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They’re the machines that won’t die. In the 1960s many airlines, banks and governments began processing sensitive transactions using giant mainframe computers—and their descendants are still in use. Now it turns out these living dinosaurs of computing als

Mainframe Computers are Open to Internet Attacks

August 7, 2015 12:37 pm | by Tom Simonite, MIT Technology Review | Comments

They’re the machines that won’t die. In the 1960s many airlines, banks and governments began processing sensitive transactions using giant mainframe computers - and their descendants are still in use. Now it turns out these living dinosaurs of computing also have a very modern vice: they overshare on the Internet.

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Claims that technical experts have solved attribution ignore legal challenges that could slow or limit how states might lawfully respond to a major cyber attack.

The Legal Problems With Cyber War are Much Bigger Than You Think

August 7, 2015 12:23 pm | by Benjamin Brake, Defense One | Comments

Claims that technical experts have solved attribution ignore legal challenges that could slow or limit how states might lawfully respond to a major cyber attack.

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Following the news of the discovery of the Stagefright flaw - characterized by many security researchers as the worst vulnerability ever to be found on devices that run Google's Android operating system - details of yet another major flaw in were unveiled

New Android 'Certifi-gate' Bug Found

August 7, 2015 12:08 pm | by Mathew J. Schwartz, Gov Info Security | Comments

Following the news of the discovery of the Stagefright flaw - characterized by many security researchers as the worst vulnerability ever to be found on devices that run Google's Android operating system - details of yet another major flaw in were unveiled at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas.

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Vendors who win the job of protecting the identities of 21.5 million victims of the largest known federal data breach will have to let the government inside their own databases, according to new contracting papers.

Contract to Notify and Protect OPM Hack Victims Now Out

August 7, 2015 10:18 am | by Aliya Sternstein, NextGov | Comments

Vendors who win the job of protecting the identities of 21.5 million victims of the largest known federal data breach will have to let the government inside their own databases, according to new contracting papers.

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And you thought dealing with code was hard. You thought you were smart. Well, those security researchers who hack physical systems not only need to know code, they need to know physics and chemistry, plumbing and engineering. Automation tools simply don't

Why Cyber-Physical Hackers Have It Harder Than You

August 7, 2015 9:58 am | by Sara Peters, Dark Reading | Comments

And you thought dealing with code was hard. You thought you were smart. Well, those security researchers who hack physical systems not only need to know code, they need to know physics and chemistry, plumbing and engineering. Automation tools simply don't exist yet. One good attack may take a year to create. And when an exploit is successful, they can only try to make it look like an accident; not slip away like it never happened at all.

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One of the best ways to reduce the cyber threat is to make it harder and more costly for adversaries to initiate attacks, says Defense Department CIO Terry Halvorsen. Powerful and innovative security measures such as multifactor authentication and biometr

How DoD is Making Cyber Attacks More Costly, Less Successful

August 7, 2015 9:50 am | by John Edwards and Eve Keiser, C4ISR & Networks | Comments

One of the best ways to reduce the cyber threat is to make it harder and more costly for adversaries to initiate attacks, says Defense Department CIO Terry Halvorsen. Powerful and innovative security measures such as multifactor authentication and biometrics, along with strategic security planning and training, could make launching attacks on DoD resources time-consuming and futile.

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Pentagon's Joint Staff unclassified email system, used by 4,000 military and civilian personnel, has been compromised by attackers, and it has been taken offline until the threat is dealt with.

Pentagon's Unclassified Email System Breached, Russian Hackers Blamed

August 7, 2015 9:29 am | by Zeljka Zorz, Help Net Security | Comments

Pentagon's Joint Staff unclassified email system, used by 4,000 military and civilian personnel, has been compromised by attackers, and it has been taken offline until the threat is dealt with.

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"Take dem bullets out the house," the text message read. The text was allegedly sent by Rickey Cummings, a 23-year-old in Waco, Texas. In 2012, Cummings, a suspected Bloods gang member, was sentenced to death for murder in the 2011 shooting deaths of two

Language Detectives Make the Web Less Anonymous

August 6, 2015 1:25 pm | by Maya Kaufman, CBS News | Comments

"Take dem bullets out the house," the text message read. The text was allegedly sent by Rickey Cummings, a 23-year-old in Waco, Texas. In 2012, Cummings, a suspected Bloods gang member, was sentenced to death for murder in the 2011 shooting deaths of two men. The text, sent one day after the murders, was used as incriminating evidence.

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