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A Dutch SIM-maker allegedly targeted by British and U.S. spying agencies says it believes there was a hacking operation, but it didn't result in a massive privacy leak.

Gemalto: Probe Into Spy Hack Finds No Massive Privacy Leak

February 25, 2015 2:54 pm | by Associated Press | Comments

A Dutch SIM-maker allegedly targeted by British and U.S. spying agencies says it believes there was a hacking operation, but it didn't result in a massive privacy leak.

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As Houston officials trumpeted the completion of DNA testing on a three-decade backlog of sexual assault kits, they also acknowledged that while the DNA of some alleged rapists went untested, the suspects committed other sexual crimes.

While Some Rape Kits Sat Untested, Suspects Committed More Assaults

February 25, 2015 10:51 am | by Katherine Driessen, Houston Chronicle | Comments

As Houston officials trumpeted the completion of DNA testing on a three-decade backlog of sexual assault kits, they also acknowledged that while the DNA of some alleged rapists went untested, the suspects committed other sexual crimes.

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A Michigan court decision recently rejected the appeal of Joseph Blackmer, the man charged with the 1981 rape of a 23-year-old married woman, four months pregnant. The case demonstrates how useful DNA technology can be in solving sexual assault cases, eve

The Saga of Rapist Joseph Blackmer's DNA

February 25, 2015 10:42 am | by Laura Berman, The Detroit News | Comments

A Michigan court decision recently rejected the appeal of Joseph Blackmer, the man charged with the 1981 rape of a 23-year-old married woman, four months pregnant. The case demonstrates how useful DNA technology can be in solving sexual assault cases, even years after the fact, as Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy readies her department to analyze DNA results from more than 8,000 cases now being tested in private and state labs.

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Brain imaging can already pull bits of information from the minds of willing volunteers in laboratories. What happens when police or lawyers want to use it to pry a key fact from the mind of an unwilling person?

Will You Need a Search Warrant for Someone's Brain?

February 25, 2015 10:26 am | by Carrie Peyton Dahlberg, Inside Science | Comments

Brain imaging can already pull bits of information from the minds of willing volunteers in laboratories. What happens when police or lawyers want to use it to pry a key fact from the mind of an unwilling person?

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Police in Europe say they've disrupted a botnet that has been serving up worldwide infections of the banking malware known as Ramnit.

Police Disrupt Banking Malware Botnet

February 25, 2015 10:17 am | by Mathew J. Schwartz, Gov Info Security | Comments

Police in Europe say they've disrupted a botnet that has been serving up worldwide infections of the banking malware known as Ramnit.

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A Texas jury has rejected the insanity defense of a former Marine in the deaths of famed "American Sniper" author Chris Kyle and another man.

Ex-Marine Convicted in 'Sniper' Trial Faces Life in Prison

February 25, 2015 10:07 am | by Jamie Stengle, Associated Press | Comments

A Texas jury has rejected the insanity defense of a former Marine in the deaths of famed "American Sniper" author Chris Kyle and another man.

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A trio of researchers from Microsoft and University of Erlangen-Nuremberg have created Kizzle, a compiler for generating signatures for detecting exploit kits delivering JavaScript to browsers.

Researchers Create Automated Signature Compiler for Exploit Detection

February 25, 2015 9:07 am | by Zeljka Zorz, Help Net Security | Comments

A trio of researchers from Microsoft and University of Erlangen-Nuremberg have created Kizzle, a compiler for generating signatures for detecting exploit kits delivering JavaScript to browsers.

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The U.S. State Department and FBI on Tuesday announced a $3 million reward for information leading to the arrest or conviction of Russian national Evgeniy Bogachev, the highest bounty U.S. authorities have ever offered in a cyber case.

US Offers Highest-Ever Reward for Russian Hacker

February 25, 2015 8:51 am | by Mark Hosenball, Reuters | Comments

The U.S. State Department and FBI have announced a $3 million reward for information leading to the arrest or conviction of Russian national Evgeniy Bogachev, the highest bounty U.S. authorities have ever offered in a cyber case.

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When Kaspersky Lab revealed that it had uncovered a sophisticated piece of malware designed to plant malicious code inside the firmware of computers, it should have surprised no one.

Why Firmware is So Vulnerable to Hacking

February 24, 2015 1:30 pm | by Kim Zetter, Wired | Comments

When Kaspersky Lab revealed that it had uncovered a sophisticated piece of malware designed to plant malicious code inside the firmware of computers, it should have surprised no one.

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A human sheds as much as 100 pounds of DNA-containing material in a lifetime and about 30,000 skin cells an hour. But who owns that DNA is the latest modern-day privacy issue before the US Supreme Court.

DNA is everywhere. Can police analyze it?

February 24, 2015 1:10 pm | by David Kravets, Ars Technica | Comments

A human sheds as much as 100 pounds of DNA-containing material in a lifetime and about 30,000 skin cells an hour. But who owns that DNA is the latest modern-day privacy issue before the US Supreme Court.

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Washington, D.C.-based R&K Cyber Solutions LLC has licensed Hyperion, a cyber security technology from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that can quickly recognize malicious software even if the specific program has not been previou

Cybersecurity Service Licenses ORNL Malware Detection Technology

February 24, 2015 12:58 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Comments

Washington, D.C.-based R&K Cyber Solutions LLC has licensed Hyperion, a cyber security technology from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that can quickly recognize malicious software even if the specific program has not been previously identified as a threat.

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Forensic reform is a long process, but in the field of bite mark matching — which was the forensics specialty an NAS report singled out for some of its harshest criticism — the “path forward” looks to be obstructed. That’s probably because with bite mark

The Path Forward on Bite Mark Matching - and the Rearview Mirror

February 24, 2015 12:25 pm | by Radley Balko, The Washington Post | Comments

Forensic reform is a long process, but in the field of bite mark matching — which was the forensics specialty an NAS report singled out for some of its harshest criticism — the “path forward” looks to be obstructed. That’s probably because with bite mark matching, the debate isn’t just about adopting better standards or practices, but also about whether the field should exist at all.

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Houston officials have completed the lab testing and review of a three-decade backlog of rape kits, yielding 850 matches in the national DNA database.

City Done With Lab Testing of Rape Kit Backlog

February 24, 2015 11:56 am | by Katherine Driessen, Houston Chronicle | Comments

Houston officials have completed the lab testing and review of a three-decade backlog of rape kits, yielding 850 matches in the national DNA database.

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For all of us, death is the end. For forensic scientists, it's also a beginning. An exhibition at London's Wellcome Collection journeys through the afterlife of violent death, from crime scene to mortuary, laboratory and courtroom.

Forensic Exhibition Shows How Science Can Make Dead Speak

February 24, 2015 11:39 am | by Jill Lawless, Associated Press | Comments

For all of us, death is the end. For forensic scientists, it's also a beginning. An exhibition at London's Wellcome Collection journeys through the afterlife of violent death, from crime scene to mortuary, laboratory and courtroom.

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Two more software makers have been caught adding dangerous, Superfish-style man-in-the-middle code to the applications they publish. The development is significant because it involves AV company Lavasoft and Comodo, a company that issues roughly one-third

Security Software Found Using Superfish-Style Code

February 23, 2015 3:14 pm | by Dan Goodin, Ars Technica | Comments

Two more software makers have been caught adding dangerous, Superfish-style man-in-the-middle code to the applications they publish. The development is significant because it involves AV company Lavasoft and Comodo, a company that issues roughly one-third of the Internet's Transport Layer Security certificates, making it the world's biggest certificate authority.

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