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From the Heartbleed bug to the Target security breach, malicious hackers have proved to be detrimental to companies’ financial assets and reputations. To combat these malevolent attackers, or “black hats,” a community of benign hackers, “white hats,” has

White Hat Hackers Keep the Web Secure

January 28, 2015 | by Stephanie Koons, Penn State | Comments

From the Heartbleed bug to the Target security breach, malicious hackers have proved to be detrimental to companies’ financial assets and reputations. To combat these malevolent attackers, or “black hats,” a community of benign hackers, “white hats,” has been making significant contributions to cybersecurity by detecting vulnerabilities in companies’ software systems and websites and communicating their findings. 

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The sole federal judge on a commission appointed by President Obama to improve forensic science in the criminal justice system has resigned in protest, criticizing the U.S. Department of Justice for muzzling its work to benefit prosecutors.

US Judge Quits Commission to Protest DoJ Forensic Science Policy

January 30, 2015 11:37 am | by Spencer S. Hsu, The Washington Post | Comments

The sole federal judge on a commission appointed by President Obama to improve forensic science in the criminal justice system has resigned in protest, criticizing the U.S. Department of Justice for muzzling its work to benefit prosecutors. U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff said he quit because the Justice Department barred it from recommending expansion of the exchange of pretrial information to include more evidence from forensic experts.

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The US military is working on replacing passwords with “cognitive fingerprints.” These rely on stylometrics, which is an analysis of how language is used by individuals. Each person has a different stylometric profile of how they type and word-process, wh

US Military to Replace Passwords with 'Cognitive Fingerprints'

January 30, 2015 10:56 am | by Tara Seals, Infosecurity Magazine | Comments

The US military is working on replacing passwords with “cognitive fingerprints.” These rely on stylometrics, which is an analysis of how language is used by individuals. Each person has a different stylometric profile of how they type and word-process, which can be more personally identifying than simple biometrics.

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Researchers report that just four fairly vague pieces of information — the dates and locations of four purchases — are enough to identify 90 percent of the people in a data set recording three months of credit-card transactions by 1.1 million users.

Credit Card Data Not as Anonymous as Thought

January 30, 2015 10:13 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT / Seth Borenstein and Jack Gillum, Associated Press | Comments

Researchers report that just four fairly vague pieces of information — the dates and locations of four purchases — are enough to identify 90 percent of the people in a data set recording three months of credit-card transactions by 1.1 million users.

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With cyber attacks on the rise, information security has become one of the country’s   fastest growing fields, with a projected 10-year growth rate of 37 percent,   according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. To help address the critical shortage   of cy

Capella University Offers New Graduate Certificates in Digital Forensics and Network Defense

January 30, 2015 8:16 am | by Capella University | Comments

With cyber attacks on the rise, information security has become one of the country’s fastest growing fields, with a projected 10-year growth rate of 37 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. To help address the critical shortage of cybersecurity specialists, Capella University has launched two new graduate certificates in Digital Forensics and Network Defense.

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People accused of carrying out terrorist attacks don’t usually make it to courtroom. They either die in the aftermath of their attacks or they just plead guilty. Or, if it’s an international case, they’re held in an overseas prison and likely never heard

The Grisly Murder that Could Save Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

January 30, 2015 8:15 am | by Susan Zalkind, Vocativ | Comments

People accused of carrying out terrorist attacks don’t usually make it to courtroom. They either die in the aftermath of their attacks or they just plead guilty. Or, if it’s an international case, they’re held in an overseas prison and likely never heard from again. That’s why when Dzhokhar Tsarnaev goes on trial for bombing the 2013 Boston Marathon, a lot of people are going to be paying attention.

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The Chinese government has adopted new regulations requiring companies that sell computer equipment to Chinese banks to turn over secret source code, submit to invasive audits and build so-called back doors into hardware and software, according to a copy

New Tech Rules in China Upset Western Companies

January 29, 2015 10:28 am | by Paul Mozur, The New York Times | Comments

The Chinese government has adopted new regulations requiring companies that sell computer equipment to Chinese banks to turn over secret source code, submit to invasive audits and build so-called back doors into hardware and software, according to a copy of the rules obtained by foreign technology companies that do billions of dollars’ worth of business in China.

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Indonesian investigators announced Thursday the co-pilot of the crashed AirAsia jet was in control when he struggled to recover the aircraft as stall warnings sounded.

Crashed AirAsia Flight Flown by Co-pilot Say Investigators

January 29, 2015 10:10 am | by Nikiek Karmini, Associated Press | Comments

Indonesian investigators announced Thursday the co-pilot of the crashed AirAsia jet was in control when he struggled to recover the aircraft as stall warnings sounded.                       

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The infamous Regin trojan is likely to have been developed by the NSA or one of its allies, after security experts found a number of similarities between it and code discovered amongst leaked Edward Snowden documents.

Regin was Work of Five Eyes Spooks, Analysis Reveals

January 29, 2015 9:41 am | by Phil Muncaster, Infosecurity Magazine | Comments

The infamous Regin trojan is likely to have been developed by the NSA or one of its allies, after security experts found a number of similarities between it and code discovered amongst leaked Edward Snowden documents.         

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When operating outside of the law, you can't rely on the police to protect your   illegal enterprise from other criminals. The Silk Road marketplace founders likely   learned this lesson in 2012 and 2013, after paying thousands of dollars to cyber   extor

Hackers Extorted Thousands from Silk Road Operators

January 29, 2015 9:29 am | by Joab Jackson, Computerworld | Comments

When operating outside of the law, you can't rely on the police to protect your illegal enterprise from other criminals. The Silk Road marketplace founders likely learned this lesson in 2012 and 2013, after paying thousands of dollars to cyber extortionists.

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The Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC), which coordinates the development of standards and guidelines for the forensic science community under the auspices of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), will hold its first se

NIST Forensic Science Standards Committees to Hold First Public Meetings

January 29, 2015 8:10 am | by NIST | Comments

The Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC), which coordinates the development of standards and guidelines for the forensic science community under the auspices of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), will hold its first set of public meetings in Orlando, Florida on February 16 and 17, 2015.

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Mexico Officially Declares Missing Students Dead

January 28, 2015 12:51 pm | by Randal C. Archibald, The New York Times | Comments

Four months after the abduction of 43 rural college students shook the nation and set off a political crisis, Mexico’s attorney general officially declared the students dead, saying confessions and forensic evidence supported the theory that their bodies were incinerated near a garbage dump.

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In a new study, researchers have examined how the sense of smell could aid victims in better identifying criminals of violent crime. Previously, using smell in forensics had been completely overlooked.

Olfactory 'Fingerprint' Provides 'Nosewitness' Testimony

January 28, 2015 12:36 pm | by Lecia Bushak, Medical Daily | Comments

In a new study, researchers have examined how the sense of smell could aid victims in better identifying criminals of violent crime. Previously, using smell in forensics had been completely overlooked.             

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The Drug Enforcement Administration abandoned an internal proposal to use surveillance cameras for photographing vehicle license plates near gun shows in the United States to investigate gun-trafficking, the agency's chief said Wednesday.

DEA Chief: US Abandoned Plan to Track Cars Near Gun Shows

January 28, 2015 12:05 pm | by Eric Tucker, Associated Press | Comments

The Drug Enforcement Administration abandoned an internal proposal to use surveillance cameras for photographing vehicle license plates near gun shows in the United States to investigate gun-trafficking, the agency's chief said Wednesday.   

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Red Hat Inc and other makers of the widely used Linux operating system for business computers updated their software on Tuesday to thwart a serious new cyber threat they warned could allow hackers to gain remote control of their systems.

Linux Makers Try to Thwart 'Ghost' Cyber Bug

January 28, 2015 11:58 am | by Reuters | Comments

Red Hat Inc and other makers of the widely used Linux operating system for business computers updated their software on Tuesday to thwart a serious new cyber threat they warned could allow hackers to gain remote control of their systems.   

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A new publication from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) provides guidance for organizations to improve security as employees move to mobile devices such as phones and tablets for their work and their applications (“mobile apps”).

NIST Guides Organizations through Mobile App Security

January 28, 2015 11:34 am | by NIST | Comments

A new publication from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) provides guidance for organizations to improve security as employees move to mobile devices such as phones and tablets for their work and their applications (“mobile apps”).

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