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A digital facial reconstruction of Jane "Annie" Doe, whose body was discovered in 1971. Image: Courtesy of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

New forensic isotope testing has revealed new information about a 1971 cold case that could help identify a young woman who was found dead more than 45 years ago.

In August 1971, the unidentified woman's remains were found scattered near a campsite in a wooded area off of Redwood Highway close to the Oregon-California border. Investigators said she had auburn or brown hair and was believed to be between 14 and 25 years old.

When the body was found, she was wearing a pink and beige waist-length coat, a long-sleeved, tan turtleneck top with a neckline zipper, Wrangler jeans (size misses 13-14 slim), and square-toed brown leather shoes with gold buckles. She also had a Mother of Pearl ring that had the letters "A" and "L" scratched into the surface as well as coins dated 1970.

On Tuesday, the National Center for Exploited and Missing Children unveiled new results from forensic isotope testing that revealed the woman, referred to as Jane "Annie" Doe, grew up in the northeast corner of the United States.

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